Easy Herbal Remedies

Grey Field Speedwell

It’s been a busy day here in the McCabe household!  Harvesting beneficial weeds, washing and hanging to dry, and finally calling it done.

I read somewhere that Chives need to hang in a vented brown paper bag to dry properly so I’m experimenting between the paper bag and a mesh bag, I’ll let you know which turned out better. I was really excited, a few dandelions that I’ve been letting grow gave me some really good roots which I hung to dry and will grind up and start a tincture later. I need to go out into the property (ours) behind the house and see what’s out there, but it’s very overgrown and I’ll need my long pants and long sleeve shirt!

This is all I could get done today before it was time to work on homework.  I’m past the halfway mark on my Cornell University Plant Medicine Certificate Course and I’m so glad I decided to take the classes! It also confirms the high-quality education I already obtained at the Herbal Academy’s Intermediate and Advanced courses of study.

Grey Field Speedwell (Veronica polita)

This is an amazing little herb that is part of the plantain family. It can be used for rheumatism, coughs, and as an expectorant. Its good for skin conditions and can combine freely with plantain in wound/rash healing.  It is rich in vitamins, tannins and the glycoside aucubin which has anti-inflammatory, diuretic and liver protective actions.

Grey Field Speedwell is full of vitamins and tannins. The speedwell (Veronica) species are used as a diuretic, for wound healing, rheumatism, diaphoretic (sweat inducing), diuretic, antioxidant, antimicrobial.

Modern studies are delving into the vast properties of the over 200 species of the Veronica plants – particularly for more glycoside properties as well as antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, also for use in food preservation and pharmacological industries.

It has a somewhat sweet flavor and can be eaten raw, tossed in salads and cooked with other greens.

Harvest and dry for teas after the growing season or infuse in oil with plantain for a skin healing salve.

Use the young leaves and stems in salads or with other greens.

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