Easy Herbal Remedies

Purple Dead Nettle

It’s been a busy day here in the McCabe household!  Harvesting beneficial weeds, washing and hanging to dry, and finally calling it done.

I read somewhere that Chives need to hang in a vented brown paper bag to dry properly so I’m experimenting between the paper bag and a mesh bag, I’ll let you know which turned out better. I was really excited, a few dandelions that I’ve been letting grow gave me some really good roots which I hung to dry and will grind up and start a tincture later. I need to go out into the property (ours) behind the house and see what’s out there, but it’s very overgrown and I’ll need my long pants and long sleeve shirt!

This is all I could get done today before it was time to work on homework.  I’m past the halfway mark on my Cornell University Plant Medicine Certificate Course and I’m so glad I decided to take the classes! It also confirms the high-quality education I already obtained at the Herbal Academy’s Intermediate and Advanced courses of study.

Purple Dead Nettle
Closeup of Purple Dead Nettle

I love this time of year, all the great things are coming up in my yard – including Purple Dead Nettle.

Purple Dead Nettle is a prolific weed that seems to be the bane of gardeners everywhere – except me. I gleefully look forward to this plant coming up each year so I can harvest and use its beneficial properties in teas and salves – and even sneak a few small leaves into a salad.

Purple Dead Nettle: Preparing for drying

Purple dead nettle (Lamium Purpureum) is common in west coast, eastern and Southern US – and pretty much everywhere else. Its called a ‘Dead’ Nettle because there are no stinging nettles. It is a memeber of the mint family and if you look at the stems you’ll find they are square.

The are high in itamin C, minerals, flavinoids, iron, fibre, although ingest it sparingly as it can be a mild laxitive. The herb is very beneficial for kidneys and liver function.

Hanging Herbs; Purple dead nettle, dillweed.

I start harvesting and drying them as soon in the spring when they come up for use later in teas and salves, saving the tender petals for salad. Be sure to give them a light rinse and pat dry before hanging – or use a salad spinner for a quick and easy dry off.

Because I have polycystic kidney disease, I consider the use of purple dead nettle as a must in my regimine to keep my kidneys healthy.

Herbal tea with dried Purple Dead Nettle

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