Easy Herbal Remedies

Another great find in my yard – Yellow Wood Sorrell (Oxalis stricta). Also known as Yellow Wood Sorrell or Creeping Yellow Sorrell, or Sour Grass

Yellow Wood Sorrell, photo by Kathy McCabe
Yellow Wood Sorrell, photo by Kathy McCabe

This is another weed that is edible and good for you. Yellow wood sorrel has a slightly sour-lemony taste that promotes saliva production which can be good for the gums and good for your digestive tract. The sour taste promotes bile production which is necessary for healthy functioning digestion.  It is a mild fever reducer and an awesome thirst quencher. Every aerial part is edible, leaves, flowers, and pods – which resemble tiny okra!

It is rich in Vitamin C and was used historically to treat scurvy, fevers, mouth sores, nausea, sore throats, and urinary infections. Its actions include febrifuge, diuretic, astringent, catalytic.

It’s a cheerful plant (in my opinion) and plays well with other useful weeds such as purple dead nettle and chickweed.

You can add yellow wood sorrel to soups, sauces, eat it raw in salads, or dry it and use it as a slightly lemon tasting seasoning.  Cooled or chilled yellow wood sorrel tea sweetened with honey is a delight.

Yellow Wood sorrell, photo by Kathy McCabe
Yellow Wood Sorrell Patch, Photo by Kathy McCabe

One caution: Yellow Wood Sorrel produces Oxalic acid which can cause problems when taken in large quantities as it inhibits calcium absorption, and if taken in moderate amounts it shouldn’t cause problems for people suffering from gout, rheumatism, or kidney stones.

Those little pods also perform a spectacular show by ejecting the seeds when ripe in what is called explosive dehiscence (made me laugh!).

Watch seed dispersal in action!

Harvest by simply pulling it out by the roots, then cut off the roots, wash and enjoy.

Wood sorrel tea

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon fresh wood sorrel leaves, flowers, and/or seed pods
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

Boil water, pour over fresh wood sorrel, and let steep for up to a half-hour. Strain, sweeten to taste, and enjoy! Recipe by https://www.wildedible.com/wild-food-guide/wood-sorrel#wood-sorrel-tea

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